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STANDARDS FOR ASSESSING THE DIVERSITY POLICIES OF BANKS, INVESTMENT FIRMS, CREDIT UNIONS

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Under Dodd/Frank, "six federal financial regulatory agencies – the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the National Credit Union Administration, and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency –" must, by law, develop standards and an approach to assessing the diversity policies and practices of entities they regulate. This means looking at diversity at all banks, investment firms, and credit unions. All of them. Each of these agencies will develop a way to determine if the policies of the entities they regulate are fair, or at least, inclusive. They are asking for comments on this.
I suggest you comment, and have even drafted proposed comment text for you at: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1_dVF9yIbI5SU_QkiwuNFg3sOkImTdXnUk5J6-pEm0ZM/edit?usp=sharing
Comments are due by Feb. 7, 2014. Submit them via email by going to: Comments on …

June 18, 1998 opposition to the Citibank/Traveler's merger

On July 25, 2012, Sandford I Weill, former Charman of Citigroup, said it’s time to break up the largest banks to avoid more bailouts. Mr. Weill, you'll recall, spearheaded the Citibank/Travelers, sparking the creation of super large financial institutions and creating the "too big to fail" dilemma. Mr. Weill accomplished this by getting policymakers to first ignore and then repeal the Glass-Steagall Act, a Depression era law designed to separate commercial from investment banks.

In an interview on CNBC, Mr. Weill stated that “ 'What we should probably do is go and split up investment banking from banking'..Have banks do something that’s not going to risk the taxpayer dollars, that’s not going to be too big to fail.' ” No kidding. Thank you, Mr. Weill. I suppose 5,151 days late is better than never at all.

An article about this matter on Bloomberg.com quoted Thomas Hoenig, a Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. board member and former head of the Kansas City Feder…

Creative Investment Research, Inc. testifies at the Joint Public Hearing on CRA

Sponsored by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Office of Thrift Supervision (The Agencies), the Joint Public Hearing on the Community Reinvestment Act Regulation was held in Arlington Virginia on July 19, 2010. We provided testimony for the hearings.

Congress passed the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) in 1977 “to encourage depository institutions to help meet the credit needs of the communities in which they operate, including low and moderate income neighborhoods, consistent with safe and sound operations.”

Our testimony follows a series of warnings we have issued since 1998:

- In an October 1998 brief filed with the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, we objected to the Citigroup/Travelers merger. We cited evidence that growing financial market malfeasance greatly exacerbated risks in financial markets, reducing the safety and soundness of large …

Minority firm part of $1.85 billion FDIC asset sale

An article by Ling-Ling Wei in today's Wall Street Journal noted that: "A partnership between Tom Barrack's Colony Capital LLC and a minority-owned investment firm won the bidding for a $1.85 billion portfolio of distressed commercial real-estate loans auctioned off by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.

The deal, the second-largest bulk sale of commercial-property debt under a public-private partnership, is expected to be announced Wednesday by the FDIC.

This deal is the first public-private setup in which a minority-owned firm has taken a stake, albeit a small one, during this economic downturn. Cogsville, an African-American-owned firm, contributed $16 million to the $218 million investment, for a 7% stake in the portfolio.

Over the past year, there have been complaints on Capitol Hill and among smaller financial firms, especially those owned by minorities and women, about the lack of minority-firm participation in various public-private investment programs.

'A lot of …

FDIC revises rules on private equity investments

According to the New York Times, "The Federal Insurance Deposit Corporation imposed(new rules governing investments by) private equity firms seeking to buy failed institutions, although they eased more onerous proposals in hopes of luring them to the table." The new rules are designed to address concerns that "private equity buyers might engage in aggressive practices that could put its deposit insurance fund at risk."

"The rules..require private equity-controlled banks to pour enough capital into a failed bank so that it has a cushion of at least 10 percent of its assets for three years. The F.D.I.C. dropped a requirement that private equity firms supply additional capital in the event of a severe downturn, required private equity firms not sell an acquired bank for at least three years, imposed restrictions barring the acquired bank from lending to companies affiliated with the private equity buyer, and exempted private equity firms from complying with the h…

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