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Showing posts with the label Financial Regulatory Reform

Section 342. Office Of Minority And Women Inclusion

Much recent attention has focused on Section 342 of the Financial Reform Bill (Dodd-Frank Bill). The section calls for the creation of Offices of Minority and Women Inclusion at all Federal financial institution regulatory agencies. While most blog comments on the Section have been negative, there has been a lack of accurate information about just what this section calls for and why.

Let's start with why. As we noted in 2003 and 2006:

"Envy, hatred, and greed have flourished in certain capital market institutions, propelling ethical standards of behavior downward. Without meaningful reform, there is a small (but significant and growing) risk that our economic system will simply cease functioning." (2003);
and

"Individuals and market institutions with the power to safeguard the system, including investment analysts and rating agencies, have been compromised. Few efficient, effective and just safeguards are in place. Statistical models created by the firm show the probabi…

Financial Reform passes!

In another stunning victory for the Obama Administration, the US Senate passed the financial regulatory reform bill by a vote of 59-39 on Thursday night. (A summary of the legislation can be found on the Senate Banking Committee website.)

We are optimistic that this legislation will begin to address the "trust issues" that now dominate the equity marketplace. It was these "trust issues" that caused a 1,000 point intra-day fall in the Dow Jones Industrial Index on May 6. Until now, rational, fair or effective solutions to the practices that caused so much turmoil in 2007, 2008 and 2009 had not been enacted in any Western economy or market system.

Market mechanisms are simply stressed to the breaking point, given the sharp rise in transaction costs. Transaction costs increased as marketplace ethics decreased. Financial market institutions, recognizing that a decline in ethical standards eventually leads to a decline in trust and an increase in transaction costs, atte…

Treasury Announces Intention to Implement Portions of Overhaul Via Executive Order

On a conference call with Assistant Secretary for Financial Institutions David Nason yesterday, Treasury Department officials announced that they will implement many parts of their plan to overhaul the nation's financial regulatory structure by executive order. This includes "streamlining the approval process for securities that contributed to the crisis now roiling Wall Street."

According to the Washington Post, "The Treasury's initiatives seek to sweep away the current patchwork of regulation over the coming decade in favor of three more powerful agencies to oversee banking, market stability, and consumer and investor protection."

Treasury officials also acknowledged that the plan is "silent on CRA," or the Community Reinvestment Act.

As Paul Krugman noted,

"Traditional, deposit-taking banks have been regulated since the 1930s, because the experience of the Great Depression showed how bank failures can threaten the whole economy. Supposedly, h…

SEC Chairman Cox on the "Blueprint for Financial Regulatory Reform"

"Statement of SEC Chairman Christopher Cox Regarding Blueprint for Financial Regulatory Reform
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
2008-53

Washington, D.C., March 29, 2008 — Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Christopher Cox today issued the following statement regarding the Blueprint for Financial Regulatory Reform being proposed by the Treasury Department:

'Recent events have provided further evidence, if more were needed, that financial services regulation in the United States needs to be better integrated among fewer agencies, with clearer lines of responsibility. Just as systemic risk cannot be neatly parceled along outdated regulatory lines, the overarching objective of investor protection can't be fully achieved if it fails to encompass derivatives, insurance, and new instruments that straddle today's regulatory divides. The proposed consolidation of responsibility for investor protection and the regulation of financial products deserves serious consideration as a way t…